SCA Conference 2012

Making Christian Landscapes:
Conversion and Consolidation in the Early Middle Ages

High Cross at Knock, Co. Mayo

The SCA 2012 conference, supported by University College Cork, Newcastle University, and The Heritage Council of Ireland, will be the first to be held outside of the UK. It will take place on 21-23 September at University College Cork. The theme of the conference is the physical and conceptual transformation of landscapes in Ireland, Britain and Atlantic Europe as a result of the conversion to Christianity and the development of ecclesiastical structures during the early medieval period.

Speakers will seek to illuminate this process through case studies of particular landscapes. They will consider a range of settlement and ritual/burial sites as well as territorial divisions and routeways in order to explore where and how people chose, or were obliged, to live, worship and be buried and how this changed over time. Papers will consider the initial process of conversion and/or changes in the nature of people's relationship with ecclesiastical sites and structures over the course of the period.

On Friday 21 September there will be an optional fieldtrip to some of southwest Ireland's finest early ecclesiastical sites, followed by the conference proper on Saturday 22 and Sunday 23. The conference is being organised in conjunction with the Making Christian Landscapes project team, which includes archaeologists and historians from University College Cork, Newcastle University and other partners.

Programme and booking information
This year, you will be able to register and pay for the conference online, or by filling out a registration form and sending it with a cheque. The online registration site and printable form are available below. Full programme and speaker information will follow soon.

Online payment and registration
Printable registration form

Getting There, Accommodation, Places to Eat, and Things to Do
Getting to Cork
Cork City Council: Travel and Tourism
CorkTourist.com
The Cork Guide